Port

by Simon Stephens

Set in Stockport and unfolding across thirteen years, Simon Stephens' Port is a celebration of the human spirit as Racheal looks to the future and opts for something better.

Port by Simon Stephens

Port

Following the success of their recent collaboration on The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, playwright Simon Stephens and director Marianne Elliott reunite to bring Port to the stage.

Stockport, 1988. It’s midnight. Racheal, eleven, and Billy, six, wait in the car in agitated excitement. Their mother is at her wits’ end with all their chatter and fighting and dreams of Disneyland. She is about to leave them for good. Their father, drunk in the flat above, has locked the door.

It’s a pivotal moment, the beginning of a thirteen-year odyssey for two kids, largely abandoned and growing up in the deprived suburban shadows of Manchester, a city that felt itself to be the most exciting in the world.

A richly colourful portrait of a town with the everyday writ large, Simon Stephens’ Port is a celebration of the human spirit as Racheal looks to the future and opts for love and life and for something better.

This production ran from 22 January to 24 March 2013.

Port Urban Photography Competition

Photo © George Logan/Corbis

Suitable for 15yrs+. Strong language throughout.

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