Studio

Since its foundation in 1984, the Studio has played a vital role in developing work for the National’s stages. It is also a resource for a wide range of artists working throughout British theatre, providing an environment in which writers, actors and practitioners of all kinds can explore, experiment and devise new work free from the pressure of public performance.

John Whatmore, of NESTA, writes about a recent visit to the studio in his blog, whatmore's posterous

'You can never legislate for creation, but if it is going to happen, happen it will at the Studio.'
Emma Rice, Artistic Director, Kneehigh Theatre

In autumn 2007, the Studio moved back into its newly-refurbished building on The Cut, which is equipped with three workshop studios, five artists’ rooms, meeting rooms and the technical capacity to support cross art-form and multimedia work at the highest levels.

Staff
Head of Studio Laura Collier
Deputy Head of Studio Sarah J Murray
Creative Technical Associate Nick Flintoff
Studio Associate Amy Hodge
Studio Projects Producer Matthew Poxon
Studio Manager Fran du Pille
Studio Facilities Officer Nastasia Tryphonos
Studio Technical Assistant Pete Maxey
Studio Assistant Philippa Neels
Writer in Residence April de Angelis
J P Morgan Resident Director Elayce Ismail

The Studio is dedicated to the memory of Max Rayne, Chairman of the NT Board from 1971-88


'I first attended a NT Studio workshop as a university student, working for a few hours with Toby Jones. To think I was part of the NT complex was, at the time, quite intoxicating. How exciting to be around real actors, hanging around and smoking and talking about "the arts". To have been able to return as a "professional", be it working with directors, writers or actors, both young and "experienced", has been just as exhilarating and continually rewarding. At the Studio you know you're entering a project on the ground level. Nothing might come of it – moreover you might not be asked to be in it even if something does – but to feel part of the creative process at such an early stage, to witness the moment where a writer is hearing his words collide with an actor's voice for the first time is wonderfully reinvigorating for one's own relationship with "the arts". I don't think there is anywhere else like it.'

Rory Kinnear